Lesson Requests & Questions

We are always happy to answer your questions on Twitter as well as in the comment sections for individual lessons, but if you have general questions about the Korean language, culture or traveling and want to get some more insight from fellow learners as well as the TTMIK staff, please leave your questions below! And if you know the answer to any of the questions posted here, please also feel free to join the conversations.

Also if you have any specific lesson request, please leave us suggestions in the comments!

whatdoyouwanttoknow

  • Essence White

    I would like to learn how to ask someone to spell something in Korean and how they would respond. For example, if I didn’t know how to spell a word like 영어, how would someone respond to tell me how to spell it.

    • Kyle

      Hey Essence,

      Because Hangul is more or less read exactly as it is written, asking someone how to “spell” a word is largely unheard of (spelling tests and competitions don’t exist in Korea), so most Koreans will ask “이 단어가/말이 어떻게 씁니까?” – How do you write this word?

      But, if you want to know the specific hangul letters, you could say:

      그 단어의 철자를 불러 주세요

      Which is a more pointed way to ask how something is spelled, but it’s not nearly as common. Most Koreans will just repeat each syllable block slowly rather than say each individual letter, so if you want the letters themselves, ask for the 철자. I hope this helps 🙂

    • Essence White

      Thank you so much for responding and helping me. I understand now and I will definitely add these phrases to my phrasebook 🙂

    • Kyle

      My pleasure! Glad I could help 🙂

  • Joseph Patterson

    hi could you take something e.g legend of the blue sea and make flashcards with the time inside the video on each flash card ,so you know were to look when learning the flashcards,this way you could learn and lots of words and when to use them,and find it easier to remember this would be a verygood idea to bring about,what do you think?

  • Logan Lysaght

    Can you guys do a lesson on 부탁하다? I’m having a lot of difficulty understanding this phrase

  • Hailey Hellesvig

    I’m doing an internship here in Korea, and when something happens (we make a mistake or forget something, etc) my fellow intern (korean) says ㅇㅇㅇ 가지고… It seems like she’s giving an excuse/feels bad for making a mistake/giving explanation. I found a little information about this phrase online, but not much. They said it was similar to ‘서’ but I feel like it has a slightly different nuance for some reason? I’d love to hear you guys give a lesson or explanation on this!!

  • Giorgia Fattori

    I found a lot of words related to movement(travel) that contain the letter 행Is that a chinese character based world/letter? If is that so it would be nice to have a lesson about it.(word builder kind)

    • Kyle

      Hi Giorgia,

      행 is indeed Sino-Korean, based off the character 行. In Pure Korean, its equivalent is 다닐 (다니다), and means “go; walk; circulate; move, travel”.

      I have personally found learning hanja to be really helpful with expanding my vocabulary and helping me better understand related words, so I use this website a lot:

      http://hanjadic.bravender.net

      If you tap on the top section of the webpage (when using a smartphone) it will turn into a search bar, and you can search in English, Korean, and Chinese characters. It will show you what hanja character a word is based on, its dictionary definition, whether or not it has a pure equivalent, and it will even show you the related characters and radicals that is used with it. I hope this helps 🙂

    • Giorgia

      Thank you , I’ll check it out for sure.

  • Can you do a series on repair? Like, how to say that something is broken and how to ask to get it fixed.

    • Can you do a Hanja series?
      Can you also do a series on takeout and delivery?

    • Murphy Alvin

      To be broken = 고장되다

    • It does. Thank you!

  • Imanu El

    안녕하세요, could you do a lesson, or a whole series actually, on Business Korean? Things like job interviews, recruitment, company situations etc. Would be extremely useful, particularly, since there doesn’t seem to be anything like it available!

  • Mihao

    Can you please explain the word 채 and a sentence structure that goes with it as in e.g. “아무것도 알지 못한 채…” ? I saw It’s often translated as “without”. I’ve found some examples online but I think you can explain this better. =)

    • Kyle

      Hello Mihao,

      Used as a postmodifier meaning something like “the unaltered state”, 채 is always paired with a verb with the past modifier “-(으) ㄴ”, and sometimes followed by “로”. For example:

      신발도 신지 않은 채로 달려 나갔습니다
      I went out without even putting my shoes on -> In the state of not wearing shoes, I went out.

      안경을 쓴 채로 잠들었습니다
      I fell asleep with my glasses on -> In the state of wearing glasses, I fell asleep

      I can understand why you’d see it translated as “without” because, when used in a negative, it usually always is translated that way. I hope this helps!

  • Dylan Hollohan

    Hello there, I’ve been studying pretty consistently with your lessons for almost two years and think I’m doing pretty well with speaking and reading, but I can’t seem to get a handle on the pronunciation of some of the teachers at my school or strangers (older people) that I meet. For that reason, I think it would be helpful to have a series of scripts with people that have poor pronunciation or a bit of a lazier style of speaking in order to help with that. When I listen to you guys I can generally imagine how a word that I have just heard is spelled. However, sometimes I feel like, if I’m hearing a new word, I couldn’t even repeat that same word back to the person if I tried. So, being able to compare the written word with their poorly pronounced word will help me expand my ability to hear Korean properly. At this point I feel that I am only able to understand Korean that sounds very “clean” and definitive. Since you are all young and educated teachers, unfortunately your pronunciation is too good :).

  • Jin

    안녕하세요!
    I came across some sentences such as: “더운 날씨가 싫어서 밖에 나가기가 싫어요” and “우리 근처에 운동하기가 편해요”. I was wondering if you could explain what ‘-기가’ means and when it is used? I would be so grateful if you could help clarify this!

    • Kyle

      Hello Jin,

      In my experience, adding “-기” to verbs puts them into the Present Progressive form (i.e., 공부하기 “studying”, 만들기 “making”), so a sentence like “더운 날씨가 싫어서 밖에 나가기가 싫어요” could be translated as “I don’t like hot weather so I don’t like going outside”. Basically, “-기” acts just like “-ing” in English. Hope this helps!

    • Jin

      Hi Kyle,

      Thanks for that! I asked someone I know and like you said, “-기” is basically the “-ing” of 한글. Just in case you’re wondering, the “가” after the “-기” acts as a subject marker and makes the verb into a noun/subject.

      So in the example, “더운 날씨가 싫어서 밖에 나가기가 싫어요”, “나가기가” (going outside) goes from the present progressive form to a noun because of the “가” at the end.

      Thanks again for your help!

    • Kyle

      My pleasure! And thanks for the note on the “-가” at the end, I wondered about that myself

  • Deepa Naidu

    Hi guys!! Thank you for your amazing website! It’s been so helpful! I am wondering if you are able to teach how to say when people speak too quickly in Korean I cannot understand it. The context for this is that I know how to say i can speak a little bit of Korean but when people speak too quickly I cannot understand it. Also how do I say i learned Korean by studying it on the ttmik website? Thanks so so much!!

    • Kyle

      Hey Deepa,

      Here are a couple things you can say if someone is speaking too fast:

      천천히 말해 주세요 –> Please speak slowly

      아직도 한국어를 배우니까 천천히 말해 주세요 –> I’m still learning Korean, so please speak slowly

      If you want to tell them how you learned Korean, you can say:

      Talk To Me In Korean의 웹 사이트로 한국어를 배웠어요 –> I learned Korean through the Talk To Me In Korean website

      I hope this helps, and good luck in your studies 🙂

  • The new guy

    Um hi im new and i was listening to lesson 8 of ttmik, and the example was “THAT is not liquor” which is 저거 술 아니에요. [ jeo-geo sul a-ni-e-yo], and i was wondering that if someone was holding the liquor, could i say 그거 술 아니에요. Hope someone could reply as soon as possible

    • Anthony M

      If they are holding alcohol why would you be telling them that it isn’t alcohol? As a joke?

    • The new guy

      Did you not understand what i was trying to ask? 저거 술 아니에요 and 그거 술 아니에요 both mean that is not liquor, so i asked if that a person was holding the liquor, then could i say 그거 술 아니에요 since it is farther away from me but closer to the other person.

    • Kyle

      Hey New Guy,

      “그거” would indeed be correct, because the object is being held by the listener. If you were to say “저거 술 아니에요”, that would imply that the object is a distance away from both the speaker and the listener. Hope this helps!

    • The new guy

      Thank you!!