Level 9 Korean Grammar

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1

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions / 손 (Hand)

2

-아/어/여 버리다 / completed action

3

Advanced Situational Expressions: When You Are Unhappy

4

-고 말다 / (unintended) completed action

5

Advanced Situational Expressions: When you are worried

6

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 발 (foot)

7

Word Builder 18 / 비 (非)

8

Advanced Situational Expressions: Asking a favor

9

-(으)ㅁ / simplifying a sentence ending

10

Sentence Building Drill 15

11

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 마음 (mind, heart)

12

-아/어/여 보이다 / looks like, seems like

13

Word Builder 19 / 신 (新)

14

Advanced Situational Expressions: 후회할 때

15

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 기분 (feeling)

16

-(으)ㄹ 테니(까) / in return for, since it will be ...

17

-(으/느)ㄴ 이상 / as long as, since

18

-(으)ㄹ까 보다 / expressing concern or reason for a decision

19

Advanced Situational Expressions: 오랜만에 만났을 때

20

Sentence Building Drill 16

21

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 생각 (thought, idea)

22

Word builder 20 / 시 (示, 視)

23

-(으)면서 / while

24

-(ㄴ/는)다면서(요), -(이)라면서(요) / didn't you say ...

25

Advanced Situational Expressions: 길을 물어볼 때

26

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 시간 (time)

27

-더니 / this happened and then that happened

28

-(으)ㄹ 바에 / might as well, I would rather

29

Advanced Situational Expressions: 차가 막힐 때

30

Sentence Building Drill 17

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 마음 (mind, heart)

Let’s talk about the use of the word 마음 (mind, heart) in Korean idioms. When you study with this series, you will learn many idiomatic expressions that are based on a certain Korean word that is used in everyday Korean conversation. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentence and check out any previous related TTMIK lessons so you can grasp the full meaning of these idioms.

This is an Advanced Idiomatic Expressions lesson related to 마음, the heart or mind. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentences. When you come across a grammar point that you are unfamiliar with, please go back and review the related TTMIK lessons.


Keyword:

마음 = heart, mind


1. 마음을 먹다 = to make up one's mind

(먹다 = to eat)

→ Literally translated, it would mean "to eat one's mind" but the actual meaning is to determine or to make up one's mind. You can use this expression when you are talking about your determination to do something, but it doesn't necessarily include or guarantee actually doing it. 


Ex) 이번에는 정말로 운동을 매일 하기로 마음 먹었어요.

= I have made up my mind to really exercise every day this time. 


2. 마음대로 하다 = to do as one wants 

(-대로 = like the way something goes) 

→ You can use this phrase to describe how one does things the way they want or choose to do whatever they want to do. You can say 마음대로 하세요 to someone to say "Do whatever you want." or "Do as you please." but if you want to be more polite you can say 편하신대로 하세요, literally meaning, "Do it the way that is comfortable for you". 


Ex) 저는 그 책 필요 없으니까 마음대로 하세요. 

= I don't need that book so do whatever you want with it. 


3. 마음에 들다 = to like, to find something likeable 

(들다 = to go in) 

→ 마음에 들다 is literally translated as "to enter one's heart" and means that you found something likeable. The difference between 좋아하다 and 마음에 들다 is that you say 좋아하다 about something that you have already liked for some time, whereas 마음에 들다 is usually about things that you see for the first time and decide that you like it. 마음에 들다 can be used people as well as things. 


Ex) 마음에 드는 가방 있어요?

= Is there a bag that you like? 


4. 마음에 걸리다 = to weigh upon one's mind, to trouble one's mind

(걸리다 = to be stuck, to be hung) 

→ 걸다 means to hang something up or to lock a door, and 걸리다 is the passive voice of 걸다. So when you say that something is hung or hooked in your mind, it means that it doesn't go through easily and it troubles your mind because you either feel bad or are worried about something or someone.  


Ex) 어제 있었던 일이 마음에 걸려요. 

= I keep thinking about what happened yesterday because I feel bad about it. 


5. 마음에 두다 = to have something/someone on one's mind

(두다 = to put something somewhere) 

→ This phrase is similar to 마음에 걸리다, but it has a weaker nuance of being worried and can refer to many other types of emotions too. You can be worried, upset, or even distracted by something. It is often used in the form 마음에 두지 마세요 to tell someone to forget about what happened or what someone has said, mainly because it won't help to think about it or it wasn't something important.


Ex) 효진 씨가 한 말은 너무 마음에 두지 마세요.

= Don't think about what Hyojin said.

= Pay no attention to what Hyojin said. 


6. 마음에 없는 말을 하다 = to say something without meaning it

(없다 = to not exist, to not have, 말 = words, language, speech) 

→ When you say something that is not "in your heart" or "in your mind", it means that you say something that you do not really mean or are serious about. You can hear this expression often when someone is complimenting too much, or when someone offers to do something they probably won't do.


Ex) 마음에도 없는 말 하지 마세요.

= Don't say what you don't even mean. 


7. 마음은 굴뚝 같다 = to wish one could something right now, to want to do something right but can not

(굴뚝 = chimney, 같다 = to be like) 

→ When you say that your heart is like a chimney, it doesn't mean that you're tough, hot-tempered, or warm. In this context, you can think of the 굴뚝 as a place where the result is coming out, which is smoke, as the result of boiling water or burning woods. So by saying 마음은 굴뚝 같다, you imply that your mind is already fixed on the result, but you haven't even started, or won't even start doing it. So you can often say this when you really want to do something but you can't, and you can also say this just to be polite. 


Ex) 도와주고 싶은 마음은 굴뚝 같지만, 오늘은 너무 바빠요. 


8. 마음이 놓이다 = to feel relieved 

(놓다 = to put down, to let go / 놓이다 = to be let go) 

→ When you are worried about something, your mind is not at ease and cannot fully rest. So when you say 마음이 놓이다, it describes how the mind is finally put down somewhere so that it can rest, instead of being held up high in anxiety. 


Ex) 그 말을 들으니까 마음이 놓이네요. 

= I feel relieved to hear that. 


9. 마음이 통하다 = to understand each other well 

(통하다 = to go through, to flow through, to circulate) 

→ When two people's mind are connected, they know each other well and they are comfortable around each other. You can use this verb 통하다 about languages as well, like when you ask if English is spoken/understood in Korea ("한국에서 영어 통해요?"). 


Ex) 마음이 통하는 친구들이랑 여행하면 너무 재미있어요. 

= Traveling with friends that you connect well with is a lot of fun. 


10. 마음이 무겁다 = to have a heavy heart, to feel bad

(무겁다 = to be heavy) 

→ This one is similar in English as well. When you have a heavy heart, you feel bad about someone's situation or about what you did or said to someone. 


Ex) 저 때문에 경기에서 진 것 같아서 마음이 무겁습니다.

= I feel bad because it looks like we lost the game because of me. 

Let’s talk about the use of the word 마음 (mind, heart) in Korean idioms. When you study with this series, you will learn many idiomatic expressions that are based on a certain Korean word that is used in everyday Korean conversation. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentence and check out any previous related TTMIK lessons so you can grasp the full meaning of these idioms.
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