Level 2 Korean Grammar

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1

Future Tense / -ㄹ/을 거예요, 할 거예요

2

Object-marking Particles / -을, -를

3

And, and then, therefore, so / 그리고, 그래서

4

And, with / -하고, -(이)랑

5

Days In A Week / 요일

6

But, However / 그렇지만, 그런데

7

“To” someone, “From” someone / 한테, 한테서

8

Telling The Time

9

Counters / 개, 명

10

Present Progressive / -고 있어요

11

Self-introduction / 자기소개

12

What Is Today's Date? / 날짜

13

Too, Also / -도 (part 1)

14

Too, Also / -도 / (part 2)

15

Only / -만

16

Very, A bit, Really, Not really, Not at all / 아주, 조금, 진짜, 별로, 전혀

17

Can, Cannot / -ㄹ 수 있다/없다

18

To be good/poor at ... / 잘하다/못하다

19

Making Verbs Into Nouns / -는 것

20

Have to, Should, Must / -아/어/여야 되다/하다

21

More.. than... / -보다 더

22

To like / 좋다 vs 좋아하다

23

If, In case / 만약, -(으)면

24

Still, Already / 아직, 벌써

25

Something, Someday, Someone, Somewhere / 누군가, 무언가, 어딘가, 언젠가

26

Imperative / -(으)세요

27

Please do it for me. / -아/어/여 주세요

28

Particles For Method, Way / -(으)로

29

More, All / 더, 다

30

Don’t do it. / -지 마세요

31

Test Your Korean – Level 2 Dialogue in 100% Korean

Still, Already / 아직, 벌써

In this lesson, we are introducing two new expressions – 아직 [a-jik], which means “still” or “not yet”and 벌써 [beol-sseo], which means “already”. Listen to find out how they are used in context in natural Korean sentences.

In this lesson we are going to learn two new expressions that have opposite meanings.


1. 아직 [a-jik] means “still” and “not yet”.

In English, generally, the word “still” is used with positive sentences, and the word “yet” is more commonly used with negative sentences. However, in Korean, the word 아직 [a-jik] is used for both positive and negative sentences. 


아직 10시예요. 

[a-jik yeol-si-ye-yo.]

= It’s still 10 o’clock.


아직 안 했어요.

[a-jik an hae-sseo-yo.]

= I haven’t done it yet.


아직 아침이에요.

[a-jik a-chi-mi-e-yo.]

= It’s still morning. 


아직 몰라요.

[a-jik mol-la-yo.]

= I don’t know yet.


To emphasize the meaning of “still happening” or “still not happening”, you can add the particle -도 [-do] after 아직 to form 아직도. 아직도 has a meaning of criticizing the other person or being a little bit mad or angry. 


아직 몰라요?

[a-jik mol-la-yo?]

= You don’t know yet?


아직도 몰라요?

[a-jik-do mol-la-yo?]

= You still don’t know? How could you still not know?


아직 안 왔어요?

[a-jik an wa-sseo-yo?]

= He’s not here yet?


아직도 안 왔어요?

[a-jik-do an wa-sseo-yo?]

= He’s still not here yet?


네, 아직도 안 왔어요.

[a-jik-do an wa-sseo-yo]

= No, he’s still not here. 


2. 벌써 [beol-sseo] means “already”. 

The usage of the word 벌써 [beol-sseo] is very similar to the English word “already”. It’s generally placed at the beginning of sentences, but it doesn’t always have to be at the beginning. 


It’s already three o’clock.

= 벌써 세 시예요.


It’s three o’clock already!

= 세 시예요, 벌써!


Both of the sentences above work. 


More sample sentences

벌써 왔어요? 

[beol-sseo wa-sseo-yo?]

= Oh, you are already here!


벌써 끝났어요.

[beol-sseo kkeut-na-sseo-yo.]

= It’s already over.


벌써 끝났어요?

[beol-sseo kkeut-na-sseo-yo?]

= Is it already over? Did it already finish?


이미 vs 벌써


Another word that you will often encounter when reading or listening to Korean that has the meaning of “already” is 이미 [i-mi]. 


이미 means “already” as well, so it seems asly 이미 and 벌써 have the same meaning, but in fact, Koreans often distinguish the meanings of these two words. 


The difference between 이미 and 벌써 lies in whether you are already aware of a fact or not. 

When you and/or the speaker know about something already and talk about it, you use 이미. 

When you are just finding out about something as you speak, you use 벌써. People don’t always stick to this rule, but this is the basic idea.


Examples

그 사람은 이미 학교를 졸업했어요. 

[geu sa-ram-eun i-mi hak-gyo-reul jo-reo-pae-sseo-yo.]

= He already graduated from school.

- You (and probably also the other person) have known about this fact since long before you say this sentence.


그 사람은 벌써 학교를 졸업했어요!

[geu sa-ram-eun beol-sseo hak-gyo-reul jo-reo-pae-sseo-yo.]

= He already graduated from school.

- You might have found out about this fact recently, or you already knew about this but the other person may have not known about it before you say it. 


Because of this difference, in normal everyday situations where we find out about new facts or new information, Korean people use 벌써 more often.


벌써 비가 오고 있어요.

[beol-sseo bi-ga o-go i-sseo-yo.]

= It’s already raining.


벌써 추워요.

[beol-sseo chu-wo-yo.]

= It’s already cold.


벌써 끝났어요.

[beol-sseo kkeun-na-sseo-yo.]

= It’s already over.

In this lesson, we are introducing two new expressions – 아직 [a-jik], which means “still” or “not yet”and 벌써 [beol-sseo], which means “already”. Listen to find out how they are used in context in natural Korean sentences.
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