Level 2 Korean Grammar

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1

Future Tense / -ㄹ/을 거예요, 할 거예요

2

Object-marking Particles / -을, -를

3

And, and then, therefore, so / 그리고, 그래서

4

And, with / -하고, -(이)랑

5

Days In A Week / 요일

6

But, However / 그렇지만, 그런데

7

“To” someone, “From” someone / 한테, 한테서

8

Telling The Time

9

Counters / 개, 명

10

Present Progressive / -고 있어요

11

Self-introduction / 자기소개

12

What Is Today's Date? / 날짜

13

Too, Also / -도 (part 1)

14

Too, Also / -도 / (part 2)

15

Only / -만

16

Very, A bit, Really, Not really, Not at all / 아주, 조금, 진짜, 별로, 전혀

17

Can, Cannot / -ㄹ 수 있다/없다

18

To be good/poor at ... / 잘하다/못하다

19

Making Verbs Into Nouns / -는 것

20

Have to, Should, Must / -아/어/여야 되다/하다

21

More.. than... / -보다 더

22

To like / 좋다 vs 좋아하다

23

If, In case / 만약, -(으)면

24

Still, Already / 아직, 벌써

25

Something, Someday, Someone, Somewhere / 누군가, 무언가, 어딘가, 언젠가

26

Imperative / -(으)세요

27

Please do it for me. / -아/어/여 주세요

28

Particles For Method, Way / -(으)로

29

More, All / 더, 다

30

Don’t do it. / -지 마세요

31

Test Your Korean – Level 2 Dialogue in 100% Korean

Telling The Time

Now that we have learned the two different number systems in Korean, it is time to talk about the time! Through this lesson, learn how to ask and tell the time in Korean! In Korean, you use the native Korean numbers to tell the time, and the sino-Korean numbers to tell the minute.

Now it’s TIME to talk about TIME!

As we have already introduced through a previous lesson, there are two number systems in Korean. Most of the time, these two number systems are used on separate occasions or they are interchangeable, but when it comes to talking about what time it is, both systems are used at the same time. 


Let’s review the numbers.


Native Korean numbers

1 하나 [ha-na]

2 둘 [dul]

3 셋 [set]

4 넷 [net]

5 다섯 [da-seot]

6 여섯 [yeo-seot]

7 일곱 [il-gop]

8 여덟 [yeo-deol]

9 아홉 [a-hop]

10 열 [yeol]

11 열하나 [yeol-ha-na]

12 열둘 [yeol-dul]


When you say the hour, you use these native Korean numbers,and numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4 change their forms a little.


Number + 시 [si] = hour

하나 + 시 = 한 시 [han si] = 1 o’clock (not 하나 시)

둘 + 시 = 두 시 [du si] = 2 o’clock (not 둘 시)

셋 + 시 = 세 시 [se si] = 3 o’clock (not 셋 시)

넷 + 시 = 네 시 [ne si] = 4 o’clock (not 넷 시)

다섯 시 [da-seot si] = 5 o’clock

여 섯 시 [yeo-seot si] = 6 o’clock

일곱 시 [il-gop si] = 7 o’clock

여덟 시 [yeo-deol si] = 8 o’clock

아 홉 시 [a-hop si] = 9 o’clock

열 시 [yeol si] = 10 o’clock

열한 시 [yeol-han si] = 11 o’clock

열 두 시 [yeol-du si] = 12 o’clock


Now, let us review some sino-Korean numbers

1 일 [il]

2 이 [i]

3 삼 [sam]

4 사 [sa]

5 오 [o]

6 육 [yuk]

7 칠 [chil]

8 팔 [pal]

9 구 [gu]

10 십 [sip]


Numbers 11 and onward are just combinations of these ten numbers. 

When you say the minute, you use these sino-Korean numbers.


Number + 분 [bun] = minute

일 분 [il bun] = 1 minute

이 분 [i bun] = 2 minutes

오 분 [o bun] = 5 minutes

십 분 [sip bun] = 10 minutes

십 오 분 [si-bo bun] = 15 minutes

삼십 분 [sam-sip bun] = 30 minutes

오십오 분 [o-si-bo bun] = 55 minutes


Let’s put the hour and minute together to tell the time.


1:05 = 1 + 시 + 5 + 분 = 한 시 오 분 [han si o bun]

1:15 = 1 + 시 + 15 + 분 = 한 시 십오 분 [han si si-bo bun]

3:20 = 3 + 시 + 20 + 분 = 세 시 이십 분 [se si i-sip bun]

10:00 = 10 + 시 = 열 시 [yeol si]

10:30 = 10 + 시 + 30 + 분 = 열 시 삼십 분 [yeol si sam-sip bun]


** N o’clock sharp is expressed with the word 정각 [ jeong-gak].

** Instead of 30분 [sam-sip-bun] you can say 반 [ban], meaning “half”.


If you are going to leave us a comment for this lesson, let’s try something interesting! Try writing the time at which you are writing the comment. For example, if you are leaving the comment at 6:35, you write something like, “지금은 여섯 시 삼십오 분이에요.” 


How to ask the time

지금 몇 시예요?

[ ji-geum myeot si-ye-yo?]

= What time is it now?


지금 몇 시 몇 분이에요?

[ ji-geum myeot si myeot-bun-i-e-yo?]

= What hour and what minute is it?


Sample sentences by our friends

미경: 저는 매일 아침 9시까지 출근해요. 퇴근은 보통 6시 30분에 해요.

[ jeo-neun mae-il a-chim a-hop-si-kka-ji chul-geun-hae-yo. toe-geu-neun bo-tong yeo-seot-si sam-sip-bun-e hae-yo.]

= I get to work by 9 every morning. I usually leave work at 6:30.

매일 [mae-il] = everyday

출근하다 [chul-geun-ha-da] = to go to work

퇴근 [toe-geun] = leaving work; finishing work

보통 [bo-tong] = usually; normally


영주: 내일 수업이 4시 반에 끝나요.

[nae-il su-eo-bi ne-si ba-ne kkeut-na-yo]

= My classes finish at 4:30 tomorrow.

내일 [nae-il] = tomorrow

수업 [su-eop] = class

끝나다 [kkeut-na-da] = to finish


영주: 오늘 몇 시에 친구를 만나요?

[o-neun myeot si-e chin-gu-reul man-na-yo?]

= What time do you meet your friend today?

만나다 [man-na-da] = to meet


혜진: 아침 7시 지하철 2호선은 전쟁터예요.

[a-chim il-gop-si ji-ha-cheol 2-ho-seo-neun jeon-jaeng-teo-ye-yo]

= At 7 o’clock in the morning, subway line number 2 is a battlefield.

지하철 [ ji-ha-cheol] = subway

2 호선 [i-ho-seon] = line number 2

전쟁터 [ jeon-jaeng-teo] = battlefield



Now that we have learned the two different number systems in Korean, it is time to talk about the time! Through this lesson, learn how to ask and tell the time in Korean! In Korean, you use the native Korean numbers to tell the time, and the sino-Korean numbers to tell the minute.
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