Level 9 Korean Grammar

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1

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions / 손 (Hand)

2

-아/어/여 버리다 / completed action

3

Advanced Situational Expressions: When You Are Unhappy

4

-고 말다 / (unintended) completed action

5

Advanced Situational Expressions: When you are worried

6

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 발 (foot)

7

Word Builder 18 / 비 (非)

8

Advanced Situational Expressions: Asking a favor

9

-(으)ㅁ / simplifying a sentence ending

10

Sentence Building Drill 15

11

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 마음 (mind, heart)

12

-아/어/여 보이다 / looks like, seems like

13

Word Builder 19 / 신 (新)

14

Advanced Situational Expressions: 후회할 때

15

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 기분 (feeling)

16

-(으)ㄹ 테니(까) / in return for, since it will be ...

17

-(으/느)ㄴ 이상 / as long as, since

18

-(으)ㄹ까 보다 / expressing concern or reason for a decision

19

Advanced Situational Expressions: 오랜만에 만났을 때

20

Sentence Building Drill 16

21

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 생각 (thought, idea)

22

Word builder 20 / 시 (示, 視)

23

-(으)면서 / while

24

-(ㄴ/는)다면서(요), -(이)라면서(요) / didn't you say ...

25

Advanced Situational Expressions: 길을 물어볼 때

26

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 시간 (time)

27

-더니 / this happened and then that happened

28

-(으)ㄹ 바에 / might as well, I would rather

29

Advanced Situational Expressions: 차가 막힐 때

30

Sentence Building Drill 17

Advanced Idiomatic Expressions – 발 (foot)

Let’s talk about the use of the word 발 (foot) in Korean idioms. When you study with this series, you will learn many idiomatic expressions that are based on a certain Korean word that is used in everyday Korean conversation. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentence and check out any previous related TTMIK lessons so you can grasp the full meaning of these idioms.

This is an Advanced Idiomatic Expressions lesson related to 발, the foot. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentences. When you come across a grammar point that you are unfamiliar with, please go back and review the related TTMIK lessons.


Keyword:

발 = foot


1. 발이 넓다 = to be well connected

(넓다 = to be wide)

→ You can use this expression to describe how someone has good social connections and knows many people in various fields. In this expression, 발 symbolizes the scope of one’s reach or influence. If you want to literally describe someone’s feet as being large or wide, you would say “발이 크다.”


Ex) 그 사람은 발이 진짜 넓은 것 같아요. 모르는 사람이 없어요.

= I think he’s really well-connected. There is not one person who he doesn’t know.


2. 발 벗고 나서다 = to throw oneself into a matter with enthusiasm 

(벗다 = to take off; 나서다 = to go, leave)

→ When someone you know is in trouble, or when you see a problem, even if it’s not directly your business, you might want to help out because you know that person needs some help. In that case, you can say “발 벗고 나서다” to describe how you throw yourself into the matter with enthusiasm. “발 벗다” here means “to take off your shoes to go into a room to do something”, but it’s never used in this way other than in this idiomatic expression. If you want to say “to take off [one’s] shoes,” you need to say “신발(을) 벗다.”


Ex) 많은 사람들이 우리를 돕기 위해서 발 벗고 나서 줬어요. = A lot of people went out of their way to help us.


3. 발을 담그다 = to be involved in something 

(담그다 = to dip, to soak)

→ When you dip your feet into water (in the sea or a swimming pool), you can say “발을 물에 담 그다.” When you take water (물) out of this phrase and just say “발을 담그다,” it means “to get involved in a matter.” This expression is usually used when you want to describe how hard it is to quit something once you start.


Ex) 드라마 보는 것에 한 번 발을 담그면 빠져나올 수 없어요.

= Once you start watching TV dramas, you can’t quit [watching them] easily.


4. 발 디딜 틈이 없다= to be really packed (디디다 = to step on something, to tread; 틈 = gap)

→ 발을 디디다 originally means “to step on something,” usually in order to start walking or to stand on it. You can use the expression “발 디딜 틈이 없다” when you want to describe how a place is really crowded and you can’t find an empty spot to fit yourself into.


Ex) 요즘 홍대는 밤에 가면 사람이 너무 많아서 발 디딜 틈이 없어요.

= These days, if you go to Hongdae at night, there are so many people [that I can barely find a place to stand].


5. 한 발 늦다 = to fall a step behind (늦다 = to be late)

→ This expression is similar to the English expression “to fall a step behind.” 한 is native number for “one,” so 한 발 can mean “one foot,” but in this context, it means “one step”; therefore, the expression literally means you are “late by just one step.”


Ex) 지하철 문이 닫히기 전에 타려고 뛰었는데 한 발 늦었어요.

= I ran to get on the train before the door closed, but I was a step behind.


6. 발 빠르게 움직이다 = to move fast, to do the necessary actions quickly (빠르게 = quickly; 움직이다 = to move)

→ 발 빠르게 움직이다 can mean “to literally and physically move fast.” It can also mean “to quickly take care of a problem” or “to quickly do the necessary actions to solve a problem or prevent it from occurring.”


Ex) 경화 씨가 발 빠르게 움직인 덕분에 문제가 더 커지지 않았어요. Thanks to Kyung-hwa, who moved fast, the problem didn’t escalate.


7. 발이 묶이다 = to be detained, confined, shackled (묶다 = to tie; 묶이다 = to be tied up)

→ If your feet are tied up by a rope or a chain, you can’t go anywhere. When you can’t go anywhere, mainly because of the situation you are in or the weather, you can use the expression “발이 묶이다.” 발 here can literally mean “feet,” but it symbolizes the inability to go somewhere.


Ex) 이 곳에 눈이 너무 많이 와서 발이 묶였어요. = It snowed too much here, so I’m snowbound.


8. 발로 뛰다 = to work hard in the field (뛰다 = to run)

→ Almost everyone runs with their feet. It’s rare to find someone who runs with their hands, but if you say “발로 뛰다’ instead of just “뛰다” it means “to work hard in the field” in the sense of actually going out and doing something to get first-hand experience as opposed to doing desk work or just researching through books.


Ex) 컴퓨터 앞에만 앉아 있는 것보다 나가서 직접 발로 뛰면 더 좋은 정보를 얻을 수 있을 거예요. Rather than sitting in front of a computer, if you go out and work in the field yourself, you will get better information.


9. 새 발의 피 = a drop in the bucket (새 = bird; 피 = blood)

→ Except some large species, birds are usually considered to be small in comparison to many other animals. If a bird is injured and bleeds from its foot, there is usually a small amount of blood because its feet are very small. If you say “새 발의 피,” it’s like the English phrase means “a drop in the bucket,” meaning that the situation is insignificant or pales in comparison to something that happened before.


Ex) 이번 일에 비하면 지난 번 일은 정말 새 발의 피예요. This is nothing compared to what happened last time.


10. 발을 끊다 = to stop visiting (끊다 = to cut)

→ If there’s a place that you visit regularly or often, but you stop visiting that place, that’s what “발을 끊다” is referring to. 발 here doesn’t literally mean “feet,” but it means the visit itself. If you cut off the 발 (visit), it means you no longer visit or go to a particular place.


Ex) 살이 많이 쪄서 살을 빼려고 자주 가던 치킨 집에 발을 끊었어요.

I’ve gained a lot of weight, so in order to lose it, I quit going to a chicken restaurant that I used to frequent.

Let’s talk about the use of the word 발 (foot) in Korean idioms. When you study with this series, you will learn many idiomatic expressions that are based on a certain Korean word that is used in everyday Korean conversation. In order to fully understand and use the expressions introduced in this series, it is essential that you understand the grammatical structure of the sentence and check out any previous related TTMIK lessons so you can grasp the full meaning of these idioms.
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